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Calling the string people...

Can someone tell me the difference (if any) between:

*  Card weaving;
*  Tablet weaving;
*  Inkle weaving.

Preferrably in very, very plain English, as though speaking to a very young and somewhat slow child.

I'm trying to make my class schedule for Pennsic, and I'm very confused.

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Comments

( 4 comments — Leave a comment )
kass_rants
Jul. 6th, 2012 07:21 pm (UTC)
Card weaving and tablet weaving are exactly the same. Some people just call the cards "tablets". There is no different in technique or tools.

Inkle weaving is narrow-ware weaving done on one of these: http://www.waynesthisandthat.com/images/inkle1.jpg

Weaving-wise, card/tablet weaving produces a particular weave because you turn the cards. Inkle weaving is typically plain weave.

You can tell the difference between card and inkle weaving by looking at the weave.

But to confuse things, you can warp cards onto your inkle loom and do card-weaving on it. But then it becomes card weaving, not inkle weaving.

Edited at 2012-07-06 07:21 pm (UTC)
rosinavs
Jul. 7th, 2012 10:27 am (UTC)
Specifically, inkle weaving is done using string heddles, rather than other sorts of heddles. (Heddles are the bits that separate the two parts of the warp into the shed.) As mentioned in a later comment, it is impossible to tell whether one has used string heddles or a rigid heddle after the fact.
vynehorn
Jul. 6th, 2012 07:34 pm (UTC)
What Kass said!
kass_rants
Jul. 6th, 2012 07:58 pm (UTC)
I should add that there's no real way to know if a narrowware was woven on an inkle loom or on another type of loom that produces narrowwares. But card/tablet weaving always imparts a distinctive structure to the pieces it produces.

There is some argument that inkle looms aren't period devices (because we have no pictures or extant looms from pre-1600). However, the weave they produce is the simplest weave (1/1) so there is nothing un-period about the bands they produce. If you see what I mean...
( 4 comments — Leave a comment )